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Crowns

Porcelain Crowns

Crowns are caps that are placed over teeth and held in place by dental adhesive. They cover the entire chewing surface of the tooth. They are normally made from either plastic resin or porcelain.

Your tooth is initially prepared for your crown, this will involve removing most of the outer surface and leaving a strong inner core. The amount of tooth removed will be the same as the thickness of the crown.

We will then take a mould of the prepared tooth, one of the opposing jaw and normally another to mark the way you bite. Two visits are usually required to complete the treatment.

Crowns are used for numerous reasons:

  • As a protective cover for a badly decayed tooth or fractured tooth
  • As a permanent restoration for a tooth with a large filling
  • To correct minor problems in your natural teeth like spacing and/or irregular shape or severe discolouration

Frequently Asked Questions

Will the dentist use an anaesthetic?

If the tooth has already been root treated this isn't necessary, but in most cases we will need to anaesthetise you before working on it so that you don’t feel anything.

How does a dentist prepare a tooth for a crown?

We will shape the tooth by removing a portion of the outer surface. Sometimes we may have to build up the core of the tooth (particularly if a lot has broken off) with filling material or place a post into your tooth so that the crown has something to sit on.

Next we will take an impression ie make a mould of your teeth and take a measurement of how you bite together. We will then record the shade of the adjacent teeth so that the new crown is an exact match for the other teeth. We then fit a temporary crown while the permanent crown is being made so that the tooth looks and feels the same.

How long do crowns last and how do I care for them?

Crowns are made materials that don't deteriorate over time. However the supporting tooth is still prone to decay and gum disease.

The ceramic on the surface of the crown can sometimes chip or fracture. Avoid chewing excessively hard substances like ice or bones. Brushing daily and flossing are essential for maintaining good oral health and keeping the crown trouble free. The most vulnerable part of the crown is the margin or the junction between tooth and crown.

Regular check ups ensure that we can detect any problems with your crown and recommend necessary treatment.

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